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Donkey Welfare

We provide support, help and advice to anyone involved in caring for or thinking of caring for donkeys and mules. As well as a team based at the main Sanctuary in Sidmouth, Devon, there is a network of welfare advisers throughout the UK, Ireland and Europe who are there to provide direct help and support to donkeys in need and to donkey owners both from our foster scheme or from private homes and organisations.

We help organise the relinquishment of donkeys and mules into the Sanctuary's care as well as oversee the fostering scheme. We are also the team to help if you see a donkey or mule in trouble.

Advice, help and support on caring for your donkeys is provided by our welfare team by calling 022 49013, Monday-Friday, 9.00 am to 4.30 pm (answerphone service outside of these hours).

All calls are strictly confidential.

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Sugar junkie

Erriff is a male model. He is photographed with great regularity. His name is taken from that of the Erriff river which flows over a waterfall called Aashleagh falls. The falls are the centerpiece of a rugged, unspoiled landscape which attracts tourists to its beauty. The river flows into the only true fjord in Ireland, Killary harbour. Fjords are more often associated with Norway where the Vikings come from.

Erriff posing for the camera

Panache lands on his feet (hooves!) in his new Guardian home

Panache the donkey lived a rather sad and lonely existence having being abandoned in a remote forest and then removed to an equine pound where his future hung in the balance. He was underweight and had the classical long, twisted hooves that indicated previous neglect. Thankfully The Donkey Sanctuary was able to secure the future of this young skewbald donkey that proved to have a very quiet, kind nature.

Panache meets Sparky

What it's all about

In our constant quest to rehome donkeys we must never lose sight of why we do it. Last week was a wonderful reminder of just how beneficial our Rehoming Scheme is to both our donkeys and our fantastic Guardians who dedicate themselves to the animals in their care. Jack and Jerry have had sarcoid trouble in the past and when we spotted the return of some growths on both donkeys we decided to transport them from their idyllic abode in the Dublin Mountains to the veterinary hospital for treatment.

Miriam delighted to have her donkeys home safe

All good things come to an end

We are saddened to hear about Moses passing away this week in Hannigan's farm, he has been a true favourite through the years. Moses came to The Donkey Sanctuary in June 2001 as a 14 year old gelding from a private home in Co Kilkenny, he had two permanent rope marks embedded on his neck indicating he was abused at some point in his life. His owner relinquished him to us as he felt he was dangerous to his cattle and to people.

Moses sporting his flash new haircut

Yara and friends glad to find sanctuary

Yara (meaning loved one) and five others found themselves in an equine pound in County Longford in May 2016 after being abandoned. Their hooves were extremely overgrown and distorted, resulting in severe pain each time they took a step.

Thankfully, the pound called us and told us about the plight of these poor donkeys. An immediate plan was put in place to bring them to safety and to help end their suffering.

Yara is a skewbald mare who was underweight and infested with lice and worms, with horrifically painful hooves. She is bonded to other donkeys Lyanna and Meera.

Yara, Lyanna and Meera with terribly overgrown hooves

Lucky Charm and Timothy move around

I have been working at The Donkey Sanctuary for a long time, twenty years plus, mainly at Knockardbane Farm where it all started from a leaking caravan and a few staff.

I can honestly say there never has been one day the same, every day comes with something different- be it happy or sad stories and endings. I recently got the task at short notice to arrange to move two of our donkeys across the water to their new home.

Lucky Charm and Timothy settling in

Rosettes and red faces at the RDS Horse Show

'"He's a lovely donkey'' is not a phrase one expects to hear at the vetting gate of the Royal Dublin Society during horse show week. A reply of ''he's an even lovelier mule'' raised a few eyebrows swiftly followed by a raft of mule/hinny related questions from the vets. This seems to set the tone for the rest of the day as myself and the mule maestro Eugene Butler displayed Sanctuary mules Bohea Lad and Kendon on a showery Sunday at the prestigious venue.

Cathy with mule Kendon

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