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Safe from the bush fire

I associate bush fires with places like Australia and they conjure images of kangaroos running from the flames.

Our work brings us into some of the remotes parts of Ireland and when the RTE news carries a headline “Firefighters make major progress over gorse fire” its implications for donkeys was not immediately obvious.

The fire was on a hillside commonage in Co Sligo and very extensive with approximately 4,000 acres affected by the fire.

Donkeys safe and sound

Please help donkeys in need like James

James was rescued by The Donkey Sanctuary after being abandoned and spending two years alone in a field with no adequate access to shelter or grazing. He was in very poor body condition with severely overgrown and twisted hooves. James like so many other donkeys have been neglected and abused and The Donkey Sanctuary has come to their rescue. The mission of the Sanctuary is to rescue, rehabilitate and re-home our donkeys by transforming their quality of life. Our vision is of a world where donkeys and mules live free from suffering, and their contribution to humanity is fully valued.

James receiving care from Donkey Sanctuary staff

Big Week on the Farm

Tune into RTE One next week to watch Big Week on the Farm as they give an insight into farming life in Ireland.

They explore the relationships that donkeys form with each other and with the people who care for them. The segment on The Donkey Sanctuary will be aired on Thursday April 6th between 7-8pm. Please tune in to see our work and learn some interesting donkey facts and footage.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter to learn more.

Our donkeys posing for the camera

What's in a name

And so I found myself attending a call to view a mare and foal in the remotest part of Connemara. It was clear from the outset that the foal was in considerable difficulty. It had an abnormal temperature and was also weak and unable to stand without assistance.

Laichin at time of rescue

Donkey Care Courses

The Donkey Sanctuary welfare team provide donkey care courses throughout Ireland catering for all abilities, levels of knowledge and interest. On Saturday past eleven enthusiastic individuals gathered in my kitchen to learn more about the wonderful world of donkeys! It became clear to me that there were four distinct groups present:

Group 1 – exuberantly enthusiast persons, keen on learning more about donkeys but had never cared for an animal bigger than a Labrador dog.

The group of donkeys enthusiasts attending the course

The Donkey Sanctuary Ireland extremely grateful for funding award of €120,000

The Donkey Sanctuary Ireland was in receipt of a funding award from The Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine on Christmas week. The funding will help to launch and implement a proposed Donkey Welfare Improvement Scheme (DWIS) for 2017.

The Donkey Sanctuary Ireland has been in operation for almost thirty years and in that time has rescued and rehabilitated over 5,250 donkeys and mules. The organisation is currently overstretched and is currently caring for a staggering 1,823 donkeys and mules.

Noel with some of our rescue donkeys

TV debut for our donkeys

On Sunday night last I got a phone-call about a slot that had opened up on the RTÉ Today Show on Monday evening. I spoke at length with Denise the researcher and we got the ball rolling! Denise wanted a donkey to come to the studio but after explaining that donkeys require companionship she quickly agreed that two donkeys would be more suitable and we knew the two girls that would be right for the job- Molly and Ginny.

Maura, Daithi, Molly, Ginny, Joe and Tríona

Home for Christmas

I first met Comet and Eclipse in July 2015, two stunning skewbald donkeys, mother and daughter. Although their elderly owner cared about them, he could no longer care for them and contacted The Donkey Sanctuary for help rehoming his donkeys. They made the long journey from Meath to Cork where they received much needed attention to their hooves, teeth and other routine treatments. Although gentle and friendly, both mares were nervous and had received only limited handling. It would take some time to return both to full health and build their trust in people.

Comet and Eclipse adapting to their new home


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